How Quickly Time Flies
So long as it doesn't take me away
Hello there darling. I do hope that we can get along. I am a strong believer in a good first impression.
(HG Wells independant RP) M!A: None
Sep
20 hours ago reblog
765
Sep
deadxgirlxwalking said:
"Mom?" The lycan asks, having sensed her around. "Mum?!?"

"Yes?"

1 day ago reblog
1
Sep

givemetheaxe:

Claudia was trying to imagine what that might have been like. “I guess it would have been easier when things were overt, unlike the systematic discrimination that plagues society today.” At least back then it would have been easier to know exactly who was responsible. “How did you manage, with all of it?”

Helena shrugged. “Honestly it was just a different set of rules that you had to learn. Sort of like chess. Once you knew all the rules, one was quite able to bend them to ones will.” She grinned remembering how easy it was to get her way back then. 

1 day ago reblog
18
Sep

into-theuniverse:

M8: Lagoon Nebula

1 day ago reblog
2867
Sep

heythereuniverse:

Moth wing scales | wellcome images

2 days ago reblog
308
Sep

wired:

Scientists discover a rare black hole in Messier 82.

MORE.

3 days ago reblog
268
Sep

heythereuniverse:

Ophiuchus Rho with Antares and M4 | VisualUniverse

4 days ago reblog
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Sep
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439
Sep

itsanexperimentjohn:

evilhouseplant:

oh my good I looked this up on google books and it is an effing goldmine

You’re Welcome.

6 days ago reblog
3374
Sep

futurist-foresight:

A look at a 1,000 strong robotic swarm in action.

futurescope:

A self-organizing thousand kilobot robot swarm

Scientist at Harvard SEAS & Wyss Institute created the first thousand-robot flash mob:

Following simple programmed rules, autonomous robots arrange themselves into vast, complex shapes

“Form a sea star shape,” directs a computer scientist, sending the command to 1,024 little bots simultaneously via an infrared light. The robots begin to blink at one another and then gradually arrange themselves into a five-pointed star. “Now form the letter K.”

The ‘K’ stands for Kilobots, the name given to these extremely simple robots, each just a few centimeters across, standing on three pin-like legs. Instead of one highly-complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors.

Just as trillions of individual cells can assemble into an intelligent organism, or a thousand starlings can form a great flowing murmuration across the sky, the Kilobots demonstrate how complexity can arise from very simple behaviors performed en masse (see video). To computer scientists, they also represent a significant milestone in the development of collective artificial intelligence (AI).

[read more] [Image courtesy of Mike Rubenstein and Science/AAAS] [kilobots on futurescope]

1 week ago reblog
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